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How to Select the Right Window Style for Your Haverhill, MA Area Home

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It’s time to replace the windows of your Haverhill home, but selecting which windows will enhance your home’s appearance and meet the energy efficiency level you desire will be a tough decision too. Discovering the difference in window styles and features they offer is an important next step in your window purchase process. Choosing a window style really depends on your home’s architecture, the purpose or use of the window, and of course, your budget.

WINDOW STYLES TO THINK ABOUT:

Awning Windows — Hinged from the top and opening outward from the bottom, awning window's construction pushes water away from the window opening. Awning windows are usually placed over fixed windows or in garages above eye level to supply ventilation and privacy at the same time. Awning windows are often found on southern home designs.

Bay and Bow Windows — Most bay windows include a large window in the middle bordered left and right by casement or double-hung windows set at 30- or 45-degree angles. The windows can be opened or fixed (or a blend of the two). The bow window feature four or more equal-size windows, most often casements displayed to create a gradual arching projection. Bay and bow windows offer amazing sweeping views, in addition to giving a room the sense of being larger than it is. Many of our Haverhill area clients opt to include a convenient window sitting area to their bay or bow windows to enhance the functionality of these windows and allow more enjoyment all year long.

Casement Windows — Often referred to as “crank out windows”, casement windows are one of the most popular style of windows in the Haverhill area. Found within many home designs, casement windows are constructed with a single sash that’s mounted on either side and opens by using a crank handle. With such a design, ventilation is aplenty with casement windows compared to double-hung windows (particularly if your window opening faces the direction of the wind). In relation to the actual look of your home, we encourage you to consider casement windows for taller windows, over wider ones. Also, because casement windows crank out, and therefore take up more space when open, we do not recommend them for heavily trafficked areas, such as decks or front porches.

Double-Hung Windows — Most commonly used in traditional, Colonial or Victorian home designs, double-hung windows feature two sashes within a single frame. The top and bottom sash bypass each other vertically when opening from the bottom up or the top down. Double-hung windows look most appropriate for your home’s architecture when they are about two-times the height as they are wide and each sash is an equal-sized square.

Fixed Windows — Fixed windows are most often used for decorative purposes or combined with other windows. Most popularly shaped in a circle, square, or hexagon, fixed windows will not open, as they are intended to bring an architectural enhancement to your Haverhill house.

Single-Hung Windows — Single-hung windows are similar to double hung windows, with one unique feature: only the bottom sash opens by pushing upward; the top sash does not open at all.

Sliding Windows — Sometimes described as sliders or gliders, sliding windows open exactly as their name implies; they move side-to-side horizontally. Sliders are great for those hard-to-reach areas in your Haverhill home, such as over the kitchen sink. Sliding windows are regularly used in multi-family buildings and apartment complexes.

Skylights — Many Haverhill homeowners that would like the extra natural light that windows bring, yet they do not have the space to permit common wall-installed windows, might consider a skylight. Skylights can be opened manually or by remote control (if such functionality is offered), which likely will bring in more light and heat than windows due to their rooftop positioning.

Transom — Similar to fixed windows, transoms are typically included with other window styles, and can be either fixed or vented units. They’re usually located atop or below the main window or door. Transoms give the illusion of bigger windows by allowing more sunlight in and more airflow if the windows vent. Transom windows are available in a variety of shapes, including square, rectangular, half-circle, elliptical and more.

Window Wall — As you might assume, a window wall is literally a wall of fixed windows and stretch from floor to ceiling. The windows that make up the wall can be of similar or different sizes/shapes and be used for exterior or interior walls.

To find the best window for your Haverhill area home, please call Pella Windows and Doors to schedule a no obligation appointment.